People move out of a house and into a condominium for different reasons. Seniors with mobility issues might be ready to downsize and leave the maintenance to someone else. Moving to a new city for a job might also mean rethinking one’s lifestyle.

Tips for Moving from a House to Condo

Whatever the reason, making the shift from house to a condo can be challenging. Here are some practical tips for making the transition smoother.

Declutter and Donate Belongings

Start by measuring out how much space you’ll have in the condo in comparison to your house. In most cases, moving to a condominium means downsizing. You might have significantly less space for your belongings. Take the time to go through your things and declutter, keeping the limitation of your new home in mind. It’s also important to get accurate measurements of the new condo, including doors and hallways, to find out if your furniture will fit.

Sell Unnecessary Tools and Furniture

One of the benefits of moving to a condo is delegating maintenance to somebody else. You’ll no longer need the bigger tools and hardware for home maintenance. If you own a lawnmower, snow plow, and other large appliances and equipment, you can sell them and add the proceeds to your moving fund. The same applies to the furniture you no longer need. You may determine that some of your tools and belongings are too valuable to part with. If that’s the case, you’ll need to find a storage option.



Plot Out the Moving Process

Moving into a condo often means introducing stairs and elevators that were never a factor in your house. This aspect, in particular, can make the moving process a nightmare. Consider hiring skilled condo apartment movers to ensure your belongings arrive safely. The “pivot” scene from Friends might be funny on-screen, but it won’t be when you’re stuck in a stairwell with a couch.

Tips for Moving from a House to Condo - condo

Rethink Your Budget

While moving from one home to another often entails a shift in budgeting, the change is more dramatic when moving to a condo. Depending on the size of your home, you’ll likely see a significant difference in heating and utility fees. Home maintenance tasks such as cleaning gutters and landscaping are also gone. If you have a condo with a gym, you might no longer require a gym membership. However, moving into a condo means embracing condo fees to cover the maintenance work. Take some time to crunch the numbers, then adjust as you get settled.

Rethink Your Furniture Style

Some people who move from houses to condos prefer to start over with furnishings. If this is the case, consider rethinking your style for a minimalist or multi-purpose approach to make the most of your limited space. Choose functional furniture, like beds with trundle storage underneath or coffee tables with nesting stools.

Clarify Your Responsibilities and Limitations

Condo living is like a strange combination of homeownership and apartment renting. On the one hand, you own your condo. On the other hand, you have to abide by the condominium organization and rules of the building. The responsibilities and limitations vary based on where you live; your condo complex might have different rules than the one next door. It’s not unusual to see restrictions on noise, pets, long-term visitors, and renovations. Take the time to understand how your responsibilities, limitations, and freedoms will change when you move.

Change Your Insurance

Another benefit of moving to a condo is the insurance savings. Call your home insurance provider before you move to get a new quote on coverage. Don’t hesitate to shop around and find the best possible deal. Your insurance savings should be significant. Moving to a condo from a house can be a positive change. Take the time to plan and prepare to make this transition smooth and enjoyable.